How-To Tuesday

I don’t know if I’ll be able to get back to regular tutorials, but here’s a quick one about doing glowy eyes for warjacks, or anything, really. One cool thing about this is that while I’m callng this “Fiery Eyes”, this method works for any color you want to do.

I start with a white undercoat, and lay down the brightest color. In my case, this is yellow. I start with the brightest because these warm paints are notoriously transparent, so rather than try to work up yellow over darker colors, I want to cheat and put darker colors over lighter ones.

It may take more than one coat to get solid color. I think I put down two. I’m using P3 Cygnar Yellow. I also added some lines of color to the nearby ridges, to create an OSL effect. Use the side of your brush for this, it’s a lot easier than trying to draw the edge with the point.

Eye_1

Next, I start adding on a darker tone. For this, I used P3 Heartfire. It’s hard to detect in the pictures, but I covered the rear 2/3 of the eye. This color needed three coats to finally show up over the yellow. This is partly due to the transparent nature of the thin paint, and partly because the two colors are very close.

Eye_2

For the next step, I used P3 Khador Red Highlight, which is really just orange. I kept this to the rear 1/3 to 1/4 of the eye. If this color is too abrupt, you can mix in some of the Heartfire to lighten it up, or glaze the transition point with a few layers of thinned down Heartfire to smooth it out.

Eye_3

To punch up the contrast, I wanted to add just a hint of red, so I grabbed P3 Khador Red, and just lined the back edge, in a V shape.

Eye_5

This proved to be a pretty rough transition, though, so I went back along the edges of the eye with Khador Red Highlight, to sort of outline the eye some.

Eye_6

Glow effects should have a nice bright center, so I used white to bruighten up the leading edge of the eye, and draw a thin line backward along the center, ending about halfway back. This is optional, but I highly suggest at least punching up the brightness of the front edge.

Eye_7

I then glazed this white line with yellow, to reclaim some of what had been lost by all of the layers of orange.

Eye_8

And thus, a Fiery Eye for this Judicator head. For those who are curious, I’m not actually painting a Judicator. I’m painting something far cooler, far more autonomous, and one-of-a-kind.

Stay tuned!

I was asked on Twitter how I paint faces, so here’s a tutorial covering a basic human male face.  At the end, I’ll cover how I tweak this process for female or non-human faces.

I’m using 100% P3 paints for this, and I’m primarily using a wet palette so I have fairly transparent paint.  This lets me use glazing.  The faces on models are too small for 2-brush blending, so the best method I’ve seen is glazing – layering thin, transparent layers of paint to build up color.

If you haven’t yet, study some faces to see where the shadows are and where the light catches.  This is a decent reference:

Mr. Jake Gyllenhall

Mr. Jake Gyllenhall

For this walk-through (and a few more to follow), I will be painting Reaper #2803, Brother Vincent.  Feel free to follow along!

I started by priming the model black, and then base coating the face with Midlund Flesh.  I used my airbrush for both of these steps to preserve detail, but several thin coats with a brush should do just fine.

DSC_9705

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It’s been a while since there was a How-to Tuesday, but today’s installment is hefty-enough to make up for the segment’s absence, I assure you.

Ashton Holbrock, aka Red Modeling Paint Studio aka kommander_redfinger on the PP forum has been streaming painting tutorials and posting them to YouTube for over two months now. He does this as part of his commission painting service.

redmodelingpaintstudio

Ashton paints the client’s mini live on Twitch, instructing them in the techniques and methods he uses to paint his amazing miniatures.  All of these videos are then archived on his YouTube channel.  He covers airbrushing, 2-brush blending, color theory and a multitude of other things as well.  If you tune into his Twitch broadcasts, he opens up the last 10-15 minutes of his hour long broadcasts to questions from the audience.

Here’s some videos of his that are very insightful:

Airbrushing:

2-Brush Blending:

So, give his YouTube channel a look, and be sure to subscribe to his Twitch feed so you can watch him live and ask questions

As promised, here’s the Battle Report featuring my terrain set. All the feedback thus far is that it’s fun to play on and looks great, so Mission Accomplished!

About the Advanced Maneuvers Channel:

Advanced Maneuvers is a local group of awesome guys that have broken into the video battle report scene. Their format and production quality is top-notch, and it’s very easy to follow what’s going on. This format is what I’m hoping to emulate when I eventually start filming games.

You can meet Kevin and Herman, two of the guys behind the AM channel on this chat with Codex Dan and Miranda (WargamerGirl) as they discuss the topic of Faction Hopping.

Holy cow, it’s a How-to Tuesday.  It’s been forever, right?  Libby and I are both very excited!  Ok, maybe she’s just excited about the peanut butter…

Libby_pb

As the Nova Nomads club grows, we wanted to focus on what we had to offer our members and the other nearby play groups around us.  One of these things is a positive and fun gaming experience.  For the longest time, players have owned and maintained their own terrain sets because up until our current store, we couldn’t store anything at the shop.  Given our new home store will allow us to do so, and we have club funding from dues (which also go towards club t-shirts, chess clocks, awards for events, etc), we wanted to get some club terrain.

In order to make this fun and exciting, and make sure we got the best looking terrain out of the time put into the project we made a competition out of it.  Club members were encouraged to group up into teams of two (or solo or threes) and com up with a concept for a table’s worth of terrain.  Lots of members had donated their personal sets to the club, so teams were free to take anything from that cache to use for their tables.  Teams were given a tupperware bin for their terrain to fit into, and each team had a $25 budget on top of whatever the club purchased for them to use.

Most of our existing tables use forests, hills and linear obstacles.  That’s great, but it leaves out lots of other fun terrain pieces like rough terrain, large obstacles, trenches, etc.  Not to mention, the terrain rules support custom combinations of things, like rough terrain plus concealment might be brambles or long grass; something that slows you down and also obscures your position, but doesn’t offer nearly the same advantages as a wall or building.

I wanted to tackle trenches, because moist of our tables look like the random countryside with hills and forests and no buildings or signs of civilization.  However, the Iron Kingdoms is full of battlefields and entrenched positions that nations feverishly defend and assault.  I wanted a real battlefield.  Since I had a ton of Khadoran bits laying around (mostly spare shields), I figured that faction was as likely to have trenches as any.

Khadoran Trenchworks Banner

So, here’s how I went about building an entire table’s worth of terrain from scratch, in about three weeks.

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